Elkab


Elkab
   Arabic name for a site in Upper Egypt south of Thebes, ancient Egyptian Nekheb, Greek Eileithyiapolis, on the east side of the Nile, opposite Hierakonpolis in the third nome of Upper Egypt, of which became the capital during the New Kingdom. The principal deity of the city was the goddess Nekhbet, tutelary goddess of Upper Egypt. Remains date from the Prehistoric Period to the Graeco-Roman Period from 7000 BC to the 4th century AD. The remains include the foundations of the temple of Nekhbet, whose standing remains were destroyed in 1828; the foundations of the smaller temple of Thoth; mastabas from the Early Dynastic Period; Old Kingdom rock tombs; and tombs from Dynasty 18 and Dynasty 19. Those of Ahmose, son of Ebana, and Ahmose Pennekhbet contain biographical texts concerning the war against the Hyksos and the early rulers of Dynasty 18. Elkab was excavated by British archaeologists from 1892–1904 and has been worked by a Belgian expedition since 1937 and more recently also by a team from the British Museum.
Historical Dictionary Of Ancient Egypt by Morris L. Bierbrier

Ancient Egypt. A Reference Guide. . 2011.